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If you're a PC gaming or HTPC enthusiast looking for the best graphics cards on the market at every price point, you've come to the right place! What you'll find here is a comprehensive guide to every card worth buying, starting at around $40 for a simple drop-in upgrade for older systems, and going up to an extreme liquid-cooled dual-card gaming setup for $1,500!

For Spring of 2018, Nvidia's grip on the entire video card market remains stronger than ever. AMD simply doesn't have anything remotely competitive, in part because its cards still suffer from grossly-inflated prices due to their popularity among cryptocurrency miners. Nvidia GeForce cards, on the other hand, are quickly dropping in price, and many are close to their historic all-time lows. Perhaps the best value of the bunch right now is the high-end GTX 1070 Ti, which is hovering right around the $500 mark and gets a recommendation in our guide. On the HTPC side of things, the GT 1030 is now back in stock at its MSRP, returning it to its rightful place as the most affordable solution for true HDMI 2.0/4K output.

Now, truth be told, we took a little 3-month hiatus from updating this guide, because in reality there just wasn't anything to buy - cryptocurrency mining had wiped store shelves clean of  GPUs. Luckily, cryptocurrency mining is now dead, and will likely remain dead for a while, so you can once again buy a GPU for PC home theater and gaming, which is of course what they're made for!

Note that in December 2017, Nvidia announced its Titan V video card, based on the brand-new Volta architecture. Priced at an eye-melting $3,000, and missing SLI support entirely (you can't even physically connect an SLI bridge), it's really just Nvidia's high-end $10,000 professional compute card, but with a significantly cut down memory subsystem. It's really not a good choice for gamers, since two GTX 1080 cards in SLI cost half as much and beat its performance. Hopefully, the Volta design will trickle down to actual gaming cards later this year. We predict a late Q3'18 release.

Prices shown in this guide use real-time pricing engines, so they are always up-to-date. Note that we also include country-specific links for our readers in Canada, the UK, and Germany. If you decide to purchase one of the cards we profile, please use the links we provide, which helps support continued development of this guide. And keep in mind that once you start throwing the kind of GPU power that the higher-end video cards in this guide provide, you'll quickly reach the limits of older CPUs, which are taxed more heavily at higher settings. Feel free to check out our Builder's Guides to get a sense of what we consider to be balanced systems in terms of CPU and GPU power. 

Video Cards - Spring 2018

    Video Card:

    MSI GeForce GT 710 2GB DDR3 Low Profile

    This is the perfect upgrade for any older PC. Whether your existing built-in video or add-in video card has stopped working, or you just need to take advantage of modern digital display or HDTV via DVI or HDMI ports, this card is a great pick. Based on the efficient Nvidia Kepler design, it uses just 19W at maximum load, meaning it won't strain even the most basic of power supplies. And with its low-profile, single-slot, fanless design, it will fit in any PC. Just keep in mind that the built-in video on Intel and AMD's latest CPUs is actually faster, so this won't be an upgrade for systems using newer CPUs. One reason you might get one anyway: if your onboard video can't support resolutions higher than 1920 x 1080. This card supports up to 2560 x 1600 via a dual-link DVI cable at a smooth 60Hz.

    The Guru's Tip:

    Because this card does not have a fan, it's completely silent. That being said, it still needs airflow, so make sure your case has at least one case fan to keep air moving around the card.

    Video Card:

    Gigabyte GeForce GT 1030 2GB

    Nvidia sat out the low-end segment with its 900-series, but has come out swinging with the new single-slot, low-profile GeForce GT 1030. While it isn't a big deal when it comes to gaming, it is a very big deal when it comes to HTPC use. And there's one simple reason: HDMI 2.0. Until now, you've had to spend nearly twice this much to get a video card with that feature, which allows 4K/60Hz output for an excellent home theater experience. 

    The Guru's Tip:

    If your PC has space for a double-slot cooler, also consider the fanless Asus GT 1030 card for a truly silent experience!

    Video Card:

    MSI GeForce GTX 1050 2GB LP

    Looking for the best all-around low-profile HTPC card? Here it is! Compared to its predecessor, the GeForce GTX 750 Ti , the 1050 2GB is about twice as fast (and is likewise twice as fast as the GT 1030 listed above), while also offering full HDMI 2.0/HDCP 2.2 support for 4K HDTVs.

    The Guru's Tip:

    This card requires no external power connector, and will draw only around 65W, compared to twice that for previous-gen full-size cards at similar performance levels.

    Video Card:

    MSI GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 4GB LP

    The GTX 1050 Ti is the fastest card ever released that doesn't need additional power connectors, meaning it uses less than 75W at maximum load. That makes it a safe bet for just about any power supply. It offers 20-25% better performance than the GTX 1050, plus double the VRAM, propelling it into an entirely different performance class.

    The Guru's Tip:

    Need to turn an HTPC into a true 1080p gaming system? This is in fact the fastest low-profile card ever made!

    Video Card:

    EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 3GB SC

    If you want to step up from light gaming to serious gaming, you need to go for the GTX 1060 3GB. It's about twice as fast as the GTX 1050 Ti. It does come in a bit bigger, and requires a power supply connection, but otherwise, it's a simple upgrade for just about any PC.

    The Guru's Tip:

    This is also the least expensive card you'll find with triple DisplayPort outputs, which are what you want to use for monitors with resolutions over 1920 x 1080.

    Video Card:

    Zotac GeForce GTX 1060 6GB Amp

    The Ethereum cryptocurrency mining craze wiped out worldwide stocks of just about every video card between $150 and $500, but luckily limited stocks of the GTX 1060 6GB have now become available. The GTX 1060 is truly the perfect mid-priced gaming card, as it's compact, efficient, and offers better performance of much more power-hungry cards from just a generation ago.

    The Guru's Tip:

    Note that we typically don't recommend anything less than 4GB of VRAM if you're gaming resolutions over 1080P, and with 6GB of VRAM onboard, this card is prepared for the future of gaming.

    Video Card:

    Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070 Ti Gaming

    Now that the GTX 1070 Ti has finally arrived (it was rumored for months), it's our new pick in the high-end segement. It offers 15% higher performance than the GTX 1070, despite costing just 5-10% more. Quiet, efficient, and incredibly fast, it's the perfect video card for a high-end 1080p or 1440p monitor, particularly those with high refresh rates and G-Sync. Due to this particular model's standard size, it's also ideal for compact systems.

    The Guru's Tip:

    Note that this card was released to combat the AMD Radeon RX Vega 56, which unfortunately is selling for well over its MSRP due to its popularity with cryptocurrency miners, leaving it dead in the water right now versus the 1070 Ti for gaming.

    Video Card:

    Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1080 Windforce 8GB

    The GTX 1080 has remained the go-to high-end card since its release in May of 2016. Debuting at $700, it dropped in price in 2017, went back up thanks to the cryptocurrency mining craze in early 2018, and is now going back down, making it a great value again. It is the perfect 2560 x 1440 card, and it can even hold its own at 4K. Furthermore, it's very efficient, using less than 180W at load, compared to the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and Titan X Pascal which use 250W.

    The Guru's Tip:

    We view the GTX 1080 as the ideal incarnation of Nvidia's Pascal design, due to its excellent balance of performance, quiet operation, and low power use.

    Video Card:

    EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti SC Black Edition

    The GTX 1080 Ti shocked pundits by coming in at a price well below expectations, and with the high-powered dual-fan cooler used on this model, it can actually outperform the much more expensive Titan Xp, as it holds maximum boost at all times.

    The Guru's Tip:

    See our GTX 1080 Ti benchmarks to learn how well this GPU performs!

    SLI Video Cards:

    2x EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FTW Hybrid 8GB

    OK, if you need way more performance than any single card can deliver, you need to step up to dual GTX 1080 cards in SLI. Our 4K Benchmarks prove that this solution will offer simply mind-blowing performance at 4K. We specifically recommend a liquid-cooled arrangement here due to the higher boost levels you'll achieve when running two high-powered GPUs in a single system. Note that your case will need room for two 120mm radiators, so check your specs before taking the plunge! Another important note: if your motherboard didn't include a high-bandwidth SLI bridge, buy an EVGA High-Bandwidth SLI Bridge or you'll be throwing away nearly 10% of this duo's performance! See our SLI Benchmarks for more info!

    The Guru's Tip:

    While 4K monitors are a good use of this power, we actually recommend 2K-class G-Sync monitors for most gamers, as they can hit between 100Hz and 165Hz, providing a much smoother experience. Check our Monitor Buyer's Guide for the best options.