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If you're a PC gamer or HTPC enthusiast looking for the best graphics cards on the market at every price point, you've come to the right place! What you'll find here is a comprehensive guide to every card worth buying, starting at around $40 for a simple drop-in upgrade for older systems, and going up to an extreme liquid-cooled dual-card gaming setup for $1,500!

For Summer of 2018, the great news is that most video cards are now back down to their all-time low prices, thanks to the complete implosion of the cryptocurrency mining industry, which had wiped store shelves clean of video cards for the first few months of 2018. On a related note, an AMD card returns to our list for the first time in a year, specifically the Radeon RX 580 8GB, which is a fantastic pick at $300 (but wasn't a great pick at $600, which it sold for during the peak of cryptocurrency madness!). With that said, Nvidia still earns our picks at every other pricepoint, thanks to its top-to-bottom product line that has something for everyone, from 4K HTPC enthusiasts to ultra-hard-core SLI gamers.

Of course nothing stands still in technology, but video cards have been performing at surprisingly similar levels for the past two years. That's because AMD has basically given up on the high-end market, taking a year to match the Nvidia Geforce GTX 1080 released in May 2016, and doing so at a higher price with its ill-fated Radeon Vega 64. So who can we turn to for more performance? Well, Nvidia may have been able to ride out its Pascal architecture for a little longer than expected, but  that's because it was really that good. With that said, rumors suggest that Nvidia's next-gen gaming card, based on the "Turing" architecture, should arrive by Fall of 2018. It will take what Nvidia delivered with its $3,000 Titan V video card, and strip it down to its gaming essence by removing compute and AI capabilities. We fully expect it to match the Titan V in performance, which is to say it will be about 30% faster than today's ~$750 GTX 1080 Ti, and will likely sell for close to $1,000. In other words, it will be cool, but it won't exactly be a bargain!

Prices shown in this guide use real-time pricing engines, so they are always up-to-date. Note that we also include country-specific links for our readers in Canada, the UK, and Germany. If you decide to purchase one of the cards we profile, please use the links we provide, which helps support continued development of this guide. And keep in mind that once you start throwing the kind of GPU power that the higher-end video cards in this guide provide, you'll quickly reach the limits of older CPUs, which are taxed more heavily at higher settings. Feel free to check out our Builder's Guides to get a sense of what we consider to be balanced systems in terms of CPU and GPU power. 

Video Cards - Summer 2018

    Video Card:

    MSI GeForce GT 710 2GB DDR3 Low Profile

    Whether your system doesn't have built-in video, your video card has stopped working, or you just need to take advantage of modern digital display or HDTV via DVI or HDMI ports, this card is a great pick. Based on the efficient Nvidia Kepler design, it uses just 19W at maximum load, meaning it won't strain even the most basic of power supplies. And with its low-profile, single-slot, fanless design, it will fit in any PC. Just keep in mind that the built-in video on Intel's latest CPUs is actually faster, so this won't be an upgrade for systems using them. But it's a great option for people building up a AMD Ryzen system, which don't have built-in video. This card supports up to 2560 x 1600 via a dual-link DVI cable at a smooth 60Hz.

    The Guru's Tip:

    Because this card does not have a fan, it's completely silent. That being said, it still needs airflow, so make sure your case has at least one case fan to keep air moving around the card.

    Video Card:

    Zotac GeForce GT 1030 2GB GDDR5

    Nvidia sat out the low-end segment with its 900-series, but thankfully offered up some serious performance with the single-slot, low-profile GeForce GT 1030. While it isn't a big deal when it comes to gaming, it is a very big deal when it comes to HTPC use. And there's one simple reason: HDMI 2.0. Until now, you've had to spend nearly twice this much to get a video card with that feature, which allows 4K/60Hz output for an excellent home theater experience. 

    The Guru's Tip:

    If your PC has space for a double-slot cooler, also consider the fanless Gigabyte GT 1030 card for a truly silent experience!

    Video Card:

    Gigabyte Geforce GTX 1050 2GB

    Looking for the best entry-level gaming card? Here it is! Compared to its predecessor, the GeForce GTX 750 Ti , the 1050 2GB is about twice as fast (and is likewise twice as fast as the GT 1030 listed above), while also offering full HDMI 2.0/HDCP 2.2 support for 4K HDTVs.

    The Guru's Tip:

    This card requires no external power connector, and will draw only around 65W, compared to twice that for previous-gen full-size cards at similar performance levels.

    Video Card:

    Zotac GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Low Profile 4GB

    The GTX 1050 Ti is the fastest card ever released that doesn't need additional power connectors, meaning it uses less than 75W at maximum load. That makes it a safe bet for just about any power supply. It offers 20-25% better performance than the GTX 1050, plus double the VRAM, propelling it into an entirely different performance class. If you have the budget for it, spring for the 1050 Ti over the 1050.

    The Guru's Tip:

    This is by far the fastest low-profile card ever made!

    Video Card:

    Zotac GeForce GTX 1060 Mini 3GB

    If you want to step up from light gaming to serious gaming, you need to go for the GTX 1060 3GB. It's about twice as fast as the GTX 1050 Ti. It does come in a bit bigger, and requires a power supply connection, but otherwise, it's a simple upgrade for just about any PC.

    The Guru's Tip:

    This is also the least expensive card you'll find with triple DisplayPort outputs, which are what you want to use for monitors with resolutions over 1920 x 1080.

    Video Card:

    MSI Radeon RX 580 8GB Armor

    The RX 580 8GB is back on our list, after nearly a year of selling well above its retail price due to its popularity in cryptocurrency mining. Now that it's priced on par with its rival the GTX 1060 6GB, it's the better pick, thanks to a more robust memory subsystem, including a full 8GB of VRAM.

    The Guru's Tip:

    With 8GB of VRAM onboard, this card is prepared for the future of gaming. No game today requires more than 8GB even at ultra-high settings.

    Video Card:

    Zotac GeForce GTX 1070 Mini 8GB

    The 1070 reclaims the title for best value in the high-end segment, now that cryptocurrency mining is dead (it was the absolute best Nvidia GPU for mining, causing it to sell out worldwide for nearly six months). It offers much higher performance than the GTX 1060, yet is still quiet and efficient, and in the case of this particular model, very compact. It's the perfect video card for 1080p or 1440p monitors, particularly those with high refresh rates and G-Sync.

    The Guru's Tip:

    Note that some GTX 1070 models are still selling for inflated prices, due to retailers being slow to adjust to the end of cryptocurrency mining. Do not pay more than $450 for any GTX 1070, no matter how fancy it looks!

    Video Card:

    Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1080 8GB G1

    The GTX 1080 has remained the go-to high-end card since its release in May of 2016. Debuting at $700, it dropped in price in 2017, went back up thanks to the cryptocurrency mining craze in early 2018, and is now back down, making it a great value again. It is the perfect 2560 x 1440 card, and it can even hold its own at 4K. Furthermore, it's very efficient, using less than 180W at load, compared to the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and Titan X Pascal which use 250W.

    The Guru's Tip:

    We view the GTX 1080 as the ideal incarnation of Nvidia's Pascal design, due to its excellent balance of performance, quiet operation, and low power use.

    Video Card:

    EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti SC Black Edition

    The GTX 1080 Ti shocked pundits by coming in at a price well below expectations, and with the high-powered dual-fan cooler used on this model, it can actually outperform the much more expensive Titan Xp, as it holds maximum boost at all times. This compact dual-fan model will stay cool under pressure, while easilly fitting into nearly any case.

    The Guru's Tip:

    See our GTX 1080 Ti benchmarks to learn how well this GPU performs!

    Video Card:

    2x EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti SC2 Hybrid 11GB

    OK, if you need way more performance than any single card can deliver, you need to step up to dual GTX 1080 Ti cards in SLI. Our 4K Benchmarks prove that this solution will offer simply mind-blowing performance at 4K. We specifically recommend a liquid-cooled arrangement here due to the higher boost levels you'll achieve when running two high-powered GPUs in a single system. Note that your case will need room for two 120mm radiators, so check your specs before taking the plunge! Want to see just how well this duo can do in 4K gaming? See our SLI Benchmarks!

    The Guru's Tip:

    While 4K monitors are a good use of this power, we actually recommend 2K-class G-Sync monitors for most gamers, as they can hit between 100Hz and 165Hz, providing a much smoother experience. Check our Monitor Buyer's Guide for the best options.