Author Topic: Grouchy Old Men  (Read 607 times)

kaal

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Grouchy Old Men
« on: February 23, 2017, 10:08:08 AM »
Well, I got caught up in a bunch of mundane other things that have just sucked up most of my play time.

Wow, how a simple question about the Gigabyte motherboard can turn into a monster ordeal. My reaction to a search on its website is enough to send me to another company. The 1st thing I wanted to find out about was memory. It started out not easy. The 1st Gigabyte website looking for the motherboard info that Bing found was listed on result page 3 & landed me in a former Russian territory, Estonia. Google was better. Google understood that I was from the USA & didn't bother looking for places in northern Europe. From the motherboard's main page it easily linked me to the specification page. From here it goes downhill. The spec page listed the memory's highlights and directed me to (Please refer "Memory Support List" for more information.) Using the search box on the page gave me another tedious job of searching through 6 pages for the right memory support list. I got smart (I thought)! I typed into Gigabyte's search box gigabyte h270 gaming 3 "memory support list" & found 2506 items spread over 126 pages. Why didn't they link up the list in the 1st place? Obviously, if you can't find the list & mistakenly buy memory that's not listed, your warranty & any technical help is worth ZERO.
I percervered and found the memory list. http://download.gigabyte.us/FileList/Memory/mb_memory_ga-h270-gaming3.pdf
What a jumbled array of data. Timing is an important criteria in selecting memory. For some timings, it shows nothing, others it shows C# & CL# or #-#-#-#. Then under a bunch of columns headed | Memory Socket Support 1 | 2 | 4 | XMP | Native | just about all the boxes are filled in with a  "v". What does that mean? I could go on but I'm just fed up so I quit.

Ari Altman

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Re: Grouchy Old Men
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2017, 01:08:46 PM »
Can you specify whether there was a particular memory kit you had in mind?

You really don't have to worry about memory support lists if you go by what's listed in the guides on The Tech Buyer's Guru, or advice I provide in this forum. I'm pretty familiar with what will work and what won't.

Note that with an H270 board, which you were searching under, there aren't a lot of choices for memory. You either get a DDR4-2133 kit or a DDR4-2400 kit. Any kit with either of these frequencies will work. You don't need to sorry about the timings (CL, etc.).

I would specifically recommend the Crucial 2x4GB Ballistix DDR4-2400 kit for that board, or if you need more memory, the Crucial 2x8GB Ballistix DDR4-2400 kit.

kaal

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Re: Grouchy Old Men
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2017, 08:31:32 AM »
Quote from: Ari Altman on February 23, 2017, 01:08:46 PM
"Can you specify whether there was a particular memory kit you had in mind?"


Nah, nothing specific.

I noticed on the Gigabyte Memory Support List that a number of manufacturers of the same size & speed kits have different model #s & that piqued my curiosity. For example, Corsair has these 3 models listed:
16GB 2Rx8 CMK128GX4M8A2400C14 DS 14-16-16-31 1.2v
16GB 2Rx8 CMK64GX4M4A2400C14  DS  14-16-16-31 1.2v
16GB 2Rx8 CMD128GX4M8A2400C14 DS 14-16-16-31 1.2v
Corsair says only the middle one is designed for the series 100 chipset (on the H270 motherboard in question), the other 2 for a X99 motherboard with list prices $1,000+.

Yeah, I understand you can put a rocket into a Volkswagen, but I thought the exercise here was to find the compatible/approved memory for a $125 motherboard. A breakout of the standard stuff would go a long way in being user friendly. Sure, I understand that someone with more money than brains would really like to soup-up their $125 mobo rig with $1,000 rocket fuel so give them their own section of the List.

What I was really curious about is what are the big differences between the
You really don't have to worry about memory support lists if you go by what's listed in the guides on The Tech Buyer's Guru, or advice I provide in this forum. I'm pretty familiar with what will work and what won't.

Quote from: Ari Altman on February 23, 2017, 01:08:46 PM
"You really don't have to worry about memory support lists if you go by what's listed in the guides on The Tech Buyer's Guru, or advice I provide in this forum. I'm pretty familiar with what will work and what won't."


That was never a thought. If there was ever the slightest concern, me & thousands of others wouldn't be here. YOU ARE AN EXPERT and sincere & appreciative thanks for your help (and you can quote me). My beef is with the sloppy manufacturer's information.

Ari Altman

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Re: Grouchy Old Men
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2017, 10:32:17 AM »
Happy to help, kaal!

I agree that memory QVL lists have gotten practically unreadable, and this is in part driven by the number of kits that manufacturers release nowadays. You have dual-channel (2 sticks) , quad-channel (4 sticks), full X99 kits (8 sticks), DDR4-2133 all the way through DDR4-4133 in 133MHz increments, red, blue, white, LED red blue or white, and RGB LED. And then you have low-profile, fancy heatsink, absurd heatsinks, and so on and so forth. So one manufacturer might have over 300 kits for current-gen PCs. And there are a lot of manufacturers!

By the way, the three kits you identified at Corsair differ in a few ways. While they are all the exact same speed, the first kit is a 128GB kit (which requires eight RAM slots and the  X99 platform), the second kit is a 64GB kit with four sticks for X99 or Z170/270, and the third kit is the same as the first except with fancy "Dominator" heatsinks.