Author Topic: The TBG Home Office Mini-ITX Build  (Read 29092 times)

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG Home Office Mini-ITX Build
« Reply #90 on: January 11, 2019, 03:07:55 PM »
No I meant a blu-ray drive when I wrote disc.  I realize it's a bigger case but it's not going to sit on a small shelf, I have a media center with large spaces for electronics.  Was thinking I may even want to add a video card in the future so that's why I was considering it.

Ah, OK, that's a different story. I'd look very seriously at a slim model with a slim DVD bay, like the RVZ02 used in the $1,250 Slim Gaming HTPC, which would support this slim Blu-Ray Burner. It's 3.3x larger by volume than the Antec, but still far smaller than the enormous Core 500, which is truly a gaming case (it's 5.5x larger by volume than the Antec).

You can learn all about the Core 500 in TBG's hands-on assembly guide. It's a great case, but it's very big for use as an HTPC case unless you are going to pack in some very power-hungry gear.

RalphP

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Re: The TBG Home Office Mini-ITX Build
« Reply #91 on: March 08, 2019, 09:24:33 PM »
Hi,

I built the Mini-ITX PC with some minor changes from the current suggested base-design.  I used an  I3-8100 CPU, Noctura cooler (so quiet!), 16 GB of RAM, 1 TB Seagate hard-drive and a 500 GB m.2 Crucial SSD.  Its a tight fit in the Antec Mini-ITX case, but not a problem.  (I used the standard GIGABYTE B360N WiFi motherboard).  This is my first build, so I had a few questions for my kids who have built several big desktops. 

The only "problem" that I have had is with the SSD drive which gets warm under major load (like a disk format to ext4 and then the system install).  The SSD is rated 0C - 70c and it hit a few peaks of 72C or so during the install.  Since then, I cranked up the fan-curve on the CPU for a bit more air-flow and drilled a bunch of small holes (~300) in the fake-grid on SSD side of the case.  The holes do not "show".  These 2 changes seem to help take the peaks off of the SSD temp.  I am currently running about 38C while browsing the web,....

I am running Linux Mint 19 (https://linuxmint.com/) and everything works perfectly!  All hardware is recognized and used.  The install to a "bare" system was trivial and it is extremely fast.  Questions about LM19 -- drop me a note!

Thanks for the article and your help!
Ralph

I'm interested in your opinion on Mint.  I was running Lubuntu in my old setup and it worked very well on such old hardware.  It did really well on getting drivers for all the legacy hardware without any fuss.

Hi,
I checked in and saw this old post.  I would suggest that you try Mint via USB and see what works for you.  There are 3 different varieties to try (essentially 3 different desktop/guis)-- Cinnamon, Mate, and XFCE.  Cinnamon is the heaviest and the prettiest.  All should have good support for hardware drivers.  I switched from Ubuntu to Mint and discovered Mint "just worked" with no "mucking around" on multiple PCs.  I have LM 19.1 on the Mini-ITX,  a 6 year old Dell Laptop, a 1 year old 14" HP laptop, and an old, low-powered Chromebook  (Acer 720)   I run Cinnamon on everything but the Chromebook where I run Mate.  A friend has Mint 19.1 running an 8 year old desktop and it works fine.
HTH,
Ralph

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG Home Office Mini-ITX Build
« Reply #92 on: March 08, 2019, 09:43:45 PM »
Hi,

I built the Mini-ITX PC with some minor changes from the current suggested base-design.  I used an  I3-8100 CPU, Noctura cooler (so quiet!), 16 GB of RAM, 1 TB Seagate hard-drive and a 500 GB m.2 Crucial SSD.  Its a tight fit in the Antec Mini-ITX case, but not a problem.  (I used the standard GIGABYTE B360N WiFi motherboard).  This is my first build, so I had a few questions for my kids who have built several big desktops. 

The only "problem" that I have had is with the SSD drive which gets warm under major load (like a disk format to ext4 and then the system install).  The SSD is rated 0C - 70c and it hit a few peaks of 72C or so during the install.  Since then, I cranked up the fan-curve on the CPU for a bit more air-flow and drilled a bunch of small holes (~300) in the fake-grid on SSD side of the case.  The holes do not "show".  These 2 changes seem to help take the peaks off of the SSD temp.  I am currently running about 38C while browsing the web,....

I am running Linux Mint 19 (https://linuxmint.com/) and everything works perfectly!  All hardware is recognized and used.  The install to a "bare" system was trivial and it is extremely fast.  Questions about LM19 -- drop me a note!

Thanks for the article and your help!
Ralph

I'm interested in your opinion on Mint.  I was running Lubuntu in my old setup and it worked very well on such old hardware.  It did really well on getting drivers for all the legacy hardware without any fuss.

Hi,
I checked in and saw this old post.  I would suggest that you try Mint via USB and see what works for you.  There are 3 different varieties to try (essentially 3 different desktop/guis)-- Cinnamon, Mate, and XFCE.  Cinnamon is the heaviest and the prettiest.  All should have good support for hardware drivers.  I switched from Ubuntu to Mint and discovered Mint "just worked" with no "mucking around" on multiple PCs.  I have LM 19.1 on the Mini-ITX,  a 6 year old Dell Laptop, a 1 year old 14" HP laptop, and an old, low-powered Chromebook  (Acer 720)   I run Cinnamon on everything but the Chromebook where I run Mate.  A friend has Mint 19.1 running an 8 year old desktop and it works fine.
HTH,
Ralph

Thanks for checking in Ralph. There are a lot of forum members who ask about Linux, so I'll point them to your post for guidance!