Author Topic: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build  (Read 58067 times)

ScottyGunn

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #300 on: April 17, 2019, 09:39:15 AM »
Hello. New to the site. I've read a few of your guides and articles, and I am enjoying the information. I am interested in building the $1.5k High End Gaming as of the Apr 19 update. I am not very up to date on modern PC components, so relying on you a lot!

My question right now is on PSU. Will 550W be sufficient after all peripherals are connected and with possible upgrades in mind for the future? Would upgrading to the same make 750W impact this build in any way other than price?

Thanks for your help

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #301 on: April 17, 2019, 09:55:59 AM »
Hello. New to the site. I've read a few of your guides and articles, and I am enjoying the information. I am interested in building the $1.5k High End Gaming as of the Apr 19 update. I am not very up to date on modern PC components, so relying on you a lot!

My question right now is on PSU. Will 550W be sufficient after all peripherals are connected and with possible upgrades in mind for the future? Would upgrading to the same make 750W impact this build in any way other than price?

Thanks for your help

Welcome to the Forum, ScottyGunn!

The 550W recommendation is designed to fully support the two major power users in the system: the CPU and GPU. None of the other components or peripherals you add to a PC will significantly affect the power use. With a Core i7-class CPU and an RTX 2070 (the current recommendations), the total power use at maximum gaming load will be around 350W. That means a 550W power supply is more than adequate.

Now, if you wanted to upgrade to a much more powerful GPU later, like an RTX 2080 Ti (which costs nearly as much as this entire system, mind you!), 550W would be cutting it close. It would still work, but the system would draw closer to 450W, which means the PSU would not be in its peak efficiency range, and would therefore run a bit hotter and louder.

With that said, looking at current prices, the Seasonic 750FM is around $92, making it just $17 more than the 550FM and therefore a very tempting upgrade. The thing is that with the $1,500 build as spec'd, it won't actually provide you a dollar worth of additional performance. It's just insurance for upgrading your GPU later on. Again, to really press the limits of a 550W PSU you'd have to use a $1,200+ GPU, which would make this a very different PC in terms of both performance and price.

To summarize, the TBG guides are designed to provide the very best balance of performance and quality at each pricepoint. If I had an extra $17 to throw at this system, I'd jump up to some Corsair Vengeance RGB RAM, which I think adds a cool aesthetic benefit.

Ultimately, the great thing is that the choice is totally yours, which is why building your own PC is so awesome!