Author Topic: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build  (Read 36318 times)

Ari Altman

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The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« on: March 04, 2014, 01:42:54 PM »
Here's the thread to discuss the "$1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build" on The Tech Buyer's Guru.

The original article can be found here:

http://techbuyersguru.com/1000build.php

Feel free to start your own threads to discuss your personal builds in this category!
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 08:02:51 AM by Ari Altman »

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2014, 02:01:46 PM »
We recently received the following inquiry from a reader and thought we'd post it and our response to help others who might have the same question:

"Hi, my son and I are going to build the $1000 gaming pc listed on your
site.  we would like to add the cpu cooling fan from the $1500 build.  Can
you tell us if this fan is compatible?
We would like to install the Thermalright Macho Rev. A on the Gigabyte
GA-Z97X-SLI.  We noticed the motherboards from both builds are described as
having an 1150 socket, and the fan lists an 1155 socket, but not the 1150.
Can you tell us if we can mount this cpu fan on this motherboard with the Intel
Core i5-4670K..."


-------------------------------------

Here's our response:

"Hello, and thanks for your e-mail and your interest in the $1000 gaming PC
builder's guide.

To answer your question, let me first set out the questions one must ask
when picking a CPU cooler:
(1) will it fit the socket layout of the motherboard?
(2) will it block the memory slots?
(3) will it block the video card slot?
(4) is it too tall to allow the case side panel to be installed?

As to question #1, all of the motherboards profiled in The Tech Buyer's
Guru gaming PC guides are socket 1150 at this point, so they can all
technically fit a socket 1150 cooler. And socket 1150 is entirely
identical to 1155 in terms of dimensions. The reason a cooler wouldn't
list 1155 is that it was originally marketed for 1155 before 1150 existed.
They are interchangeable.

Now, the bigger concern is whether the Thermalright Macho will block the
video card or hit the side of the case. The Corsair 200R can fit a 165mm
tall cooler, and the Macho is 162mm tall. It will therefore fit, but it
will be very close to the side panel. And the cooler is 152mm wide with
the fan installed, meaning it may block the first PCIe slot on the
Gigabyte Z97X-SLI board, but luckily, the video card slot is in position
#2. No problem there.

Finally, because the Macho is offset, it will not interfere with the RAM
slots, so it passes in all regards.

All this being said, I should mention that the optional cooler
recommendation listed in the $1,000 Build Guide - the Cooler Master Hyper
212 Evo
  - would be more than capable of cooling the 4670K at all but very
high overclocks, so you may want to consider that as well. It's smaller in
every dimension than the Macho."

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2014, 02:07:06 PM »
Here's a follow-up question from our reader regarding the use of a solid-state drive:

"I am a novice,  but confident that my son and I can learn together and achieve our goal.
I am curious about the addition of the solid state drive.  I am planning to
include it on our build.  A couple of questions.....  We would like to
install Windows 7 os. When we start the system, will we need to select
which hard drive to install the os on in the bios?
The other question is, what is the benefit of the ssd? I thought I read
about faster start ups.
Oh, and third, will we need to tell the machine anything as far as
separating the two hard drives, or will that be automatic.
Like I said... novice, trying to avoid any costly mistakes."


---------------------------------------------------

And here's our response:

"(1) To set up an SSD, you'll need to take a couple of additional steps.
These are all outlined in a guide on the TBG website. Installing the OS is simple - the Windows installer will ask you to select the drive you want to use.

And yes, you should definitely use an SSD. It provides significantly
better boot up times and system responsiveness. No $1,000 system should be
without one!

(2) As for cases with a bit more style, I can recommend a few options:

- the NZXT Phantom 410

- the Corsair Graphite 230T

- the Cooler Master Storm Scout 2 Advanced"

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2014, 08:47:16 AM »
We received the following question from a reader and thought it would be helpful to pass along our response:

"Could the $1000 build for july be made inside an Antec P180b case? I'm a
complete novice at this and that is my current case which I'd like to
re-use."


-----------------------------------

Here's are our thoughts on the matter:

"You'll have no problem re-using the P180, which was a great case in its time. There are a few things you'll be missing out on, such as front-panel USB 3.0 ports, improved cable routing, and simplified drive bays. But other than that, there is no issue, and certainly no compatibility problem."

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2014, 10:32:54 AM »
We received the following inquiry from a reader regarding power supplies, and thought we'd pass along our response:

"I have heard some friends complain about not having enough power over the long run.  In an effort to avoid having power supply issues over time, we are considering going with a 750w power supply rather than the 500w one listed in the $1000 build list.

It looks like the tower mounts the power supply on the bottom.  Would it be as simple as just ordering the power supply listed with the $1500 build
components? *(EVGA Supernova G2 750W)  *I am just trying to avoid any compatibility issues as we move along with collecting all of the parts."


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here's our reply:

"I am quite confident that 500W is sufficient for your build, as we use it in one of the TBG's high-end gaming builds. But as it happens,
the EVGA Supernova G2 750W is often on promotion at Amazon. It is an absolutely fantastic deal at, and in many ways is superior to the
Corsair 500W model recommended in the $1,000 Build Guide. In addition to having 50% more power, it is both quieter and more efficient.
In fact, we're using the 850W Supernova G2 in the ultra-high-end build we put together for a Tech Buyer's Guru builder's guide, and
would recommend the Supernova G2 line to anyone.

Here's a direct link to the EVGA Supernova G2 750W

And here's the article where you can read more about the Supernova and see
how nicely it installs in mid-tower ATX case."
« Last Edit: July 31, 2014, 10:34:43 AM by Ari Altman »

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2015, 09:37:53 AM »
We've just put together a detailed step-by-step pictorial for the $1,000 build, using the NZXT S340 case and Core i5-4690K!

Check it out here.

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2015, 09:07:13 PM »
We just got a really good question from a reader about the $1,000 build and wanted to pass along our response.

Here's the question:

"Just curious why you don't include a cpu cooler in your list of parts? Do you not feel it necessary for such a build?"

------------------------------------

Here's our reply:

"The $1,000 Builder's Guide lists an optional CPU cooler in the CPU section, the Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo.

The reason it's not listed as a required item is that the system will function very well using even the stock Intel cooler that comes with the CPU. The only reason you would need to add an aftermarket product is to support significant overclocking, say over 4GHz or so. The Intel cooler is actually relatively quiet at stock speeds, and is comparable to midrange aftermarket coolers in that regard."


By the way, for anyone interested in learning more about CPU cooling, definitely check out our recent article, The Complete Guide to CPU Coolers.

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2015, 09:13:16 AM »
A reader just sent in a few questions about tailoring this system to home office use. We thought we'd pass along our suggestions in case others are looking to do the same thing.

> I stumbled upon The Tech Buyer's Guru yesterday and it has been a great
> find.  I've been looking for a place that has builds for different budgets
>  at purposes.  I am looking to build my own PC and since it's been a
> while I had a few questions.
>
> I am looking to build a computer that is capable of multi-tasking since I
>  work from home and would be able to handle at least three 1080p
> monitors. Much of what I do is heavy web browsing and working with office
> files.  I am looking a gaming PCs because from my knowledge they can
> handle more multi-tasking and multi-monitors than basic computers.  I'm
> not a huge PC gamer but if I built a solid gaming PC, who knows?  I am
> trying to stay under $1,000 at this point.  Which of your builds would you
> recommend for my purposes?


----------------------------------------------

Here's our response:

"You are right that gaming computers can handle multi-tasking quite well, but there are a few things that you can tweak to optimize them for home office work.

I would start with the $1,000 Build, given your budget.

And here's what I would change given your purposes:

(1) Drop from the Core i5-4690K to the Core i5-4590 or the Core i5-4690.

(2) Bump up from 8GB to 16GB of RAM.

(3) Bump up from a 250GB solid-state drive to the 500GB solid-state drive (sticking with the Crucial BX100 series), and drop the hard drive entirely unless you need to store very large data files.

(4) If gaming is really a secondary concern, drop down to the GTX 950 listed as an option in the $500 Build.

(5) Drop down to a 500W power supply, as listed in the $750 Build.

The great news is that once you make all these changes, you'll actually save money versus the standard $1000 build, and you'll have a PC better-suited to your needs. And don't worry, any modern graphics card can handle three 1080p monitors. You'll just need a few different types of cables (one HDMI and two DVI cables, most likely, but it will depend on your monitors)."

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2015, 07:25:37 AM »
A reader just sent us some feedback on the $1,000 Build, along with a question about controlling video card noise. Check out his e-mail and our response:

> I picked up everything in the $1,000 buyers guide and the build was super
>  easy -- thanks so much for your help! I also picked up the Dell U3415w
> and absolutely love it.
>
> I am having one issue though -- when I'm gaming the fan on the Gigabyte
> turns on super loud for like 3-5 seconds and then shuts back off. It
> continues to do this every 30-40 throughout the game and is extremely
> loud.
>
> Is there anyway to change how the fan comes on? I'd much rather it be on
> more often then have it keep turning on and off super loud.
>
> I tried Google but couldn't find many people talking about the fan on
> this card at all -- any input you have would be greatly appreciated.


----------------------------------------------------

"Glad to hear that the $1,000 Build and Dell U3415W are working out so well for you!

The fan noise on the Gigabyte R9 380 is probably being caused by the card hitting a pre-set temperature threshold, forcing a high fan speed.

To control fan speeds, I recommend you use MSI Afterburner. While its primary purpose is for overclocking, it also provides excellent manual fan controls. You can either set a fixed fan speed or a custom fan profile. You can find a short tutorial on the use of Afterburner in this TBG article."

brette1e$adele

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2015, 08:25:07 AM »
Hi,
This will be my first DIY computer build so thanks for the great buying guide.  I've purchased everything required you listed for the build but was wondering if there is anything secondary I would need, say like a sound card (or is that build into the motherboard)?  Also, can you confirm that Windows 7 would be compatible with this build?  Thanks again. 

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2015, 08:35:03 AM »
Hi,
This will be my first DIY computer build so thanks for the great buying guide.  I've purchased everything required you listed for the build but was wondering if there is anything secondary I would need, say like a sound card (or is that build into the motherboard)?  Also, can you confirm that Windows 7 would be compatible with this build?  Thanks again.

You will be all set with the build - it has built-in audio, as well as built-in wired Ethernet, and most of the cables you'll need. As noted in the guide, you'll need an extra SATA data cable if using an optical drive in addition to an SSD and hard drive. The only other component you might want would be a wireless internet adapter if you do not have an Ethernet cable available at your desktop area.

Windows 7 will work fine with this system, although I would recommend that if you do not yet own a copy, you simply buy a copy of Windows 10 instead. It is superior overall. If you already have Windows 7, you can feel free to use it for now, but you may want to take advantage of the free upgrade Microsoft is offering through mid-2016.

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2015, 03:24:43 PM »
Hello, this guide with all the components are great for the $1,000 build, I just had a few questions:
 
1)I wanted to add the XFX Double Dissipation R9 390 8GB video card instead. I thought it would allow better graphics for the long term. Would it be compatible everything else staying the same? I'd get the Corsair Graphite 230T case.
2) With the larger card would I need to get an after market cooler for the cpu? If so any recommendations. I don't really plan on overclocking.
3) Should I get my own Arctic Silver 5 Silver Thermal Compound, several people recommend over the preapplied.
4) With the larger card I was going to get a bigger power supply EVGA SuperNOVA 750 B1 80+ BRONZE, 750W for power flexibility. Any issues with that?

Thanks again for your guide. It's been a long time since I helped build my last computer and this time I'll have to do it solo.


Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2015, 04:39:10 PM »
Hello, this guide with all the components are great for the $1,000 build, I just had a few questions:
 
1)I wanted to add the XFX Double Dissipation R9 390 8GB video card instead. I thought it would allow better graphics for the long term. Would it be compatible everything else staying the same? I'd get the Corsair Graphite 230T case.
2) With the larger card would I need to get an after market cooler for the cpu? If so any recommendations. I don't really plan on overclocking.
3) Should I get my own Arctic Silver 5 Silver Thermal Compound, several people recommend over the preapplied.
4) With the larger card I was going to get a bigger power supply EVGA SuperNOVA 750 B1 80+ BRONZE, 750W for power flexibility. Any issues with that?

Thanks again for your guide. It's been a long time since I helped build my last computer and this time I'll have to do it solo.

Hello, Gremlin, and welcome to the TBG Forum!

I'll take your questions one at a time:
(1) The XFX Radeon R9 390 8GB is a great card, and it will work without any issue with this system. It will fit in the Corsair Graphite 230T case, and the Double Dissipation cooler is very effective. Over the long term, it will likely be a bit more future-proof than the Zotac GTX 970 due to the higher amount of VRAM, but it's more expensive and uses far more power, which is why it isn't the standard recommended card for the $1,000 Build.

(2) Great question about the CPU cooler. The good news is that you won't need to upgrade from the standard Intel cooler.The recommended Core i5-6500 CPU is incredibly efficent and runs very cool, but note that it's not overclockable. If it were, a better cooler would not only be recommended, it would be required, as the Core i5-6600K overclockable processor does not come with a heatsink.

(3) The truth about Arctic Silver 5 is that's it's not a particularly good product. I used it for years, because at one time it was the only thermal paste on the market. There are much better products available today, such as Arctic MX-4 and Noctua NT-H1. That being said, you don't need any of these products for a processor as efficient as the Core i5-6500. They are only important for processors that will be overclocked to extreme levels.

(4) I do recommend a slightly upgraded power supply to use the XFX Radeon R9 390. The Evga Supernova 750 B1, is a good choice and a very good value.

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2015, 02:35:29 PM »
We just received a great e-mailed question from a reader about the latest updates to this build. We thought we'd take the opportunity to share our response with others:

Here's the question:

"Really enjoy your site. Getting ready to do my first build ever and i am
following pretty close to your November 2015 $1000 build.  I was very
excited when i saw the addition of the GTX 970 this month as i was already
trying to work it into the October build.  I did have a question as to why
you recommended the Zotac version over the EVGA version you recommend in
your video card buyers guide.  New to this so not sure i understand enough
to know the difference.  Appreciate your guidance, keep up the good work."


----------------------------------------

Here's our response:


"This is a fantastic question, and here's the simple answer: the Zotac is
the least expensive 970 right now, and is the only one that fits in the
$1,000 budget.

If you've noticed, we've changed up the $1,000 build significantly over the
past few months, going for a non-overclockable CPU and motherboard, but
that CPU is a very fast Skylake quad-core CPU. It equals the previous
4690K out of the box, and frees up room in the budget for a higher-end
GPU. Overall, this makes for a much better gaming machine.

And the Zotac is every bit as fast at the same clocks as the EVGA listed
in the Video Card Buyer's Guide. It just so happens that the EVGA comes
clocked 100MHz faster. The Zotac could easily hit the same speed, but yes,
the EVGA will have a bit more headroom at the high end if you are really
pushing the clocks. For a $1,000 gaming machine, having the
highest-overclocking video card really isn't a priority, as the build
isn't designed for extreme tweakers. It's designed for great
out-of-the-box performance with as little fuss as possible. No special
cooling or tweaking needed!"

Gremlin

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Re: The TBG $1,000 Gaming/Productivity PC Build
« Reply #14 on: November 14, 2015, 12:59:48 AM »
Thank you for responding to my previous question. But I am looking at sales right now and a different upgraded card came available on Newegg that I am thinking of using for this build.

It's the SAPPHIRE NITRO Radeon R9 390.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202164&utm_medium=Email&utm_source=IGNEFL111315&cm_mmc=EMC-IGNEFL111315-_-EMC-111315-Index-_-DesktopGraphicsCards-_-14202164-S0F

With the sale and rebate it's going for cheaper than the XFX Double Dissipation R9 390 card. Would it still work with the Corsair Graphite Series 230T desktop?

Thank you
« Last Edit: November 14, 2015, 04:44:10 AM by Ari Altman »