Author Topic: TBG's Guide to Assembling an Ultra-High-End PC (2016)  (Read 6684 times)

TomBor77

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Re: TBG's Guide to Assembling an Ultra-High-End PC (2016)
« Reply #15 on: September 17, 2016, 09:41:14 AM »
Sure thing, Thomas from sunny Glasgow Scotland :)

Ari Altman

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Re: TBG's Guide to Assembling an Ultra-High-End PC (2016)
« Reply #16 on: September 17, 2016, 10:10:06 AM »
Sure thing, Thomas from sunny Glasgow Scotland :)

Excellent, you are now on the home page!

In other news, I've begun my open-air GTX 1080 SLI testing:



It took about 30 seconds for the top card to hit its throttling point of 83C, which I never saw once while during my 1070 SLI mixed-cooler testing, nor when running a single GTX 1080. Now, I'm not pushing extreme overclocks, so I'm not too worried about losing a few speed bins, but this is the element of SLI that enthusiasts may not contemplate when going for the fastest open-air cards on the market. That top card is simply not going to perform as well as you might want!

TomBor77

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Re: TBG's Guide to Assembling an Ultra-High-End PC (2016)
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2016, 11:31:52 AM »
Thirty seconds!

Would that be brand specific or just a case of 1080 generating a lot more heat than 1070?

Ari Altman

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Re: TBG's Guide to Assembling an Ultra-High-End PC (2016)
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2016, 11:43:02 AM »
Thirty seconds!

Would that be brand specific or just a case of 1080 generating a lot more heat than 1070?

I'm pretty confident the same problem would occur with the GTX 1070 in SLI if you used two open-air coolers. With my mixed combo of open-air and blower cards, I had temperatures around 75C for the open-air card and 79C for the blower card on the bottom. And that was without having to do any major tweaking.

Remember, this testing has been done with a 240mm liquid CPU cooler keeping CPU heat out of the case, and the ACX 3.0 cooler on the EVGA GTX 1070 and 1080 cards I'm using is one of the best. Yes, you can spend another $30-$50 to get a GTX 1080 with larger fans and a much larger footprint, but they'll still run into the same problem, just not quite as quickly.

Now, since I posted my results, I've tamed the top GTX 1080 card with an ultra-aggressive 1:1 fan ratio (i.e., it runs at 80% fan speed at 80C, which is NOT quiet, while just barely maintaining that temp). The bottom card is running at the same clock speed but is hitting 69C with a 40% fan speed. So, you can definitely use two open-air cards, but it takes more tweaking using specialized GPU applications running in the background.

Ari Altman

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Re: TBG's Guide to Assembling an Ultra-High-End PC (2016)
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2016, 01:35:03 PM »
By the way, in case you're looking up prices in the UK, Amazon.co.uk has the Zotac GTX 1070 Founders Edition for a great price, lower than any other FE. Given that all FE cards are identical and made directly by Nvidia, no need to pay a premium for another brand.

As for the open-air models, I'd consider the EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 SC. The "premium" open-air model is the MSI GTX 1070 Gaming X, which has larger fans and may be able to maintain slightly lower temps at the same noise levels.

TomBor77

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Re: TBG's Guide to Assembling an Ultra-High-End PC (2016)
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2016, 02:00:18 PM »
Many thanks, duly noted.

For the founders edition I am thinking its a toss up between the Zotac you linked to and EVGA for me. I am not sure where you are based Ari, but assuming stateside? Had I been there I would have probably gone for the Zotac, but apparently they do not have their RMA centre in UK so for any issues the card will be sent to China. This is not the case for EVGA who has a centre in the UK so any potential issues should (in theory at least, I have no first hand experience) be dealt with much faster. Though the warranty on Zotac is longer (5 vs 3 years).

As for the open air card the SC looks very good, many thanks for the recommendation!

Ari Altman

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Re: TBG's Guide to Assembling an Ultra-High-End PC (2016)
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2016, 03:02:06 PM »
Many thanks, duly noted.

For the founders edition I am thinking its a toss up between the Zotac you linked to and EVGA for me. I am not sure where you are based Ari, but assuming stateside? Had I been there I would have probably gone for the Zotac, but apparently they do not have their RMA centre in UK so for any issues the card will be sent to China. This is not the case for EVGA who has a centre in the UK so any potential issues should (in theory at least, I have no first hand experience) be dealt with much faster. Though the warranty on Zotac is longer (5 vs 3 years).

As for the open air card the SC looks very good, many thanks for the recommendation!

Yes, I agree, the need to RMA to China is not ideal. The Founders Edition is going to be quite reliable, however, given that it's a design fully vetted by Nvidia and used by all system integrators.

EVGA is of course exemplary when it comes to service, at least in the U.S. where I'm based, so I wouldn't blame you for choosing EVGA for the Founders Edition card. Just realize that the card is not built any differently (nor does it have a lower chance of failure) than other Founders Edition cards.

TomBor77

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Re: TBG's Guide to Assembling an Ultra-High-End PC (2016)
« Reply #22 on: September 18, 2016, 12:27:58 AM »
I see, so a FE from any partner should be identical regardless of the branding. Are they manufactured at Nvidia and then sent to partners to 'distribute' or does Nvidia just supply the designs for coolers with the partners actually manufacturing it?

Ari Altman

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Re: TBG's Guide to Assembling an Ultra-High-End PC (2016)
« Reply #23 on: September 18, 2016, 07:41:12 AM »
I see, so a FE from any partner should be identical regardless of the branding. Are they manufactured at Nvidia and then sent to partners to 'distribute' or does Nvidia just supply the designs for coolers with the partners actually manufacturing it?

The Founders Edition is an Nvidia Time-to-Market (NVTTM) product. They all come with a circuit board stamped with Nvidia's name, which means Nvidia builds the entire board, along with the cooler of course. Whether they are fully assembled by Nvidia I can't say for sure.