Author Topic: Desktop Upgrading  (Read 5052 times)

brette1e$adele

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Re: Desktop Upgrading
« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2019, 08:34:56 PM »
I'm back looking for more upgrading information. ;)  This time to upgrade his processor.

Current Spec's -
Processor: Intel Core i5-4590S Processor
Motherboard: ASRock H97 Pro4
Power Supply: ENERMAX REVOLUTION85+
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1060 6GB

Thanks,
Brette

Ari Altman

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Re: Desktop Upgrading
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2019, 08:29:53 AM »
I'm back looking for more upgrading information. ;)  This time to upgrade his processor.

Current Spec's -
Processor: Intel Core i5-4590S Processor
Motherboard: ASRock H97 Pro4
Power Supply: ENERMAX REVOLUTION85+
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1060 6GB

Thanks,
Brette

Welcome back, Brette!

What is your goal in upgrading the CPU? Are there specific applications that are not performing well?

There are a few upgrades you can make from the 4590S, which I know was itself a previous upgrade, but the motherboard doesn't support any of the latest models, so for a major upgrade, you may need to upgrade the motherboard as well, which is more complicated.

brette1e$adele

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Re: Desktop Upgrading
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2019, 09:13:20 AM »
Ari,

The main goal was to improve fps while competitive gaming.  His computer appears to be sluggish, which is why we thought an upgrade to his processor might be needed.  Technically he should be able to run games on the highest quality possible due to his video card but lately some games he needs to reduce quality to increase FPS.  You are correct about the current processor being a previous upgrade but it was upgraded with the previous motherboard (the one that got juice spilt on it).  All in all, this is the "oldest" component. 

Any suggestions would be considered.

Thanks,
Brette

Ari Altman

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Re: Desktop Upgrading
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2019, 09:29:42 AM »
Ok, let's focus on improving having performance. What I recommend to test the system is to run windows task manager in the background while gaming. It will graph the load on the CPU, RAM, and GPU. Whichever is closest to 100% utilization is most likely the culprit. Report back once you've had a chance to test it. I think it could be the CPU or GPU, potentially both depending on the particular game. Some will run perfectly on the 4590S, others will struggle.

brette1e$adele

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Re: Desktop Upgrading
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2019, 07:11:39 AM »
So We ran the test and for one game (Mordhau) the CPU was running in the 70 - 80% range and the GPU was ranging between 40-70% and getting 30 FPS.

Then he got on Mechwarrior Online and tested it with all his settings on High.  While loading into the game his GPU was working at 98% but during intense game play it was running below 50%.  His CPU was running again around 70% and his FPS dropped to 40 FPS. 

RAM stayed consistant around 30%

Also his CPU speed was running consistantly close to it's max 2.89 gHZ for both tests.

I took a video so if you require different information I can refer back to the video.

Ari Altman

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Re: Desktop Upgrading
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2019, 07:27:28 AM »
So We ran the test and for one game (Mordhau) the CPU was running in the 70 - 80% range and the GPU was ranging between 40-70% and getting 30 FPS.

Then he got on Mechwarrior Online and tested it with all his settings on High.  While loading into the game his GPU was working at 98% but during intense game play it was running below 50%.  His CPU was running again around 70% and his FPS dropped to 40 FPS. 

RAM stayed consistant around 30%

Also his CPU speed was running consistantly close to it's max 2.89 gHZ for both tests.

I took a video so if you require different information I can refer back to the video.

OK, excellent information. This definitely tells me that the CPU is being maxed out. It's a little counter-intuitive, but a CPU at 70% and a GPU at 70% are not the same thing. You see, games don't use all of a CPU's cores equally, because the game engine will almost always need to run its main code on just one core. So if a CPU is at 70% in a game, that almost certainly means that one of its cores is totally maxed out, which then becomes the bottleneck. Some games can effectively use more than one core (or even more than four), so getting a CPU with more cores is also helpful, but I think in your situation, you are being limited by your single-core performance.

So there are two options available, one simple, one complex:

(1) Buy a Core i7-4790K processor from Newegg.ca for CAN$494. It will almost certainly allow you to push your GPU to 100% all the time. This is a quad-core, 8-thread powerhouse that will run at a minimum of 4GHz at all times. It's the fastest CPU ever released for the motherboard socket you're using (LGA 1150). The issue is that because it's not produced anymore, the remaining stock is quite expensive.

(2) If you wanted more future-proofing, you'd have to upgrade your CPU, motherboard, and RAM. That is going to be a lot more expensive, but it opens up the option of using six- and eight-core CPUs with more powerful architectures. You could then go with a processor like the Core i5-9600K for CAN$340, which offers slightly better performance than the 4790K (it's a six-core, six-thread processor, but has faster cores). You'd need a new motherboard for a minimum of CAN$100, plus 16GB of DDR4 RAM for a minimum of CAN$100 as well. The total price is just slightly higher, but the upgrade process is a lot more complicated.

So, to sum up, you have the easy route, which means buying older tech for a high price, but getting a drop-in solution, or you have the more complicated route, which just requires a lot more installation time. If you decide to go with option 2, let me know and I can suggest a motherboard and RAM.

brette1e$adele

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Re: Desktop Upgrading
« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2019, 03:18:19 AM »
Ok well lets work on option 2.   8)

Ari Altman

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Re: Desktop Upgrading
« Reply #22 on: May 09, 2019, 07:17:07 AM »
Ok well lets work on option 2.   8)

All right, sounds good!

So, as I mentioned, the Core i5-9600K would be a very big upgrade from your 4590S. It has 50% more cores (6), and 50% higher clockspeed, as well as a 15% improvement in performance per clock cycle. That will combine to provide a 75-100% boost in most applications. Now, you could go higher than that, for example to the Core i7-9700K, which is an eight-core processor for an extra CAN$!50, but I'd leave that for another upgrade down the road if you ever need it. Honestly, I think you'll want to upgrade the video card before you make that move.

With that said, here are the upgrade parts I recommend:
(1) CPU: Intel Core i5-9600K - CAN$340
(2) Motherboard: Gigabyte Z390 Gaming X - CAN$195 + $4 shipping (sale ends in 4 days)
(3) RAM: Corsair 2x8GB Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000 - CAN$127 (sale ends today!)

This comes out to a total of CAN$665, which is about $100 more than I originally proposed, but I've selected better motherboard and RAM models to give you a better investment versus the most stripped-down models. The motherboard in particular offers dual M.2 solid-state drive slots, 8 USB ports, and full support for overclocking, which you may want to tinker with at some point. And the RAM speed of 3000MHz is ideal for this platform, while cost just a few dollars more than much slower RAM. Also note that I found sale prices on those two items at Newegg.ca, so that's what I linked to above. Saves you about CAN$30 if you order now!

One other thing I should mention is that if you'll have to move your Windows 10 license over to the new system, but this is very easy if you log into Windows 10 using a Microsoft login name and password. That way the license is connected to your e-mail address, rather than the motherboard of the old system, which is not where you'll want the license!
« Last Edit: May 09, 2019, 07:18:56 AM by Ari Altman »