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The HTPC Build / Re: The TBG Home Theater PC Build
« Last post by Ari Altman on Today at 07:41:22 AM »
Hello Ari,

Video encode is 99%, cpu is 43%, memory is 17% , converting from .ts to mp4 H.264 full HD 1080P using Movavi video suite converter. What is cool about the software is that it uses the video card to help convert to different formats. In addition to converting old VHS media to DVD I am using it to edit and convert saved channel master DVR+ recordings.

Would a 1070 card improve the time? does it offer 4K output? Which one would you recommend?

Thanks,
Frank

Frank - do you mean that the GPU is listed as running at 100% in Windows Task Manager? You referred to it as "video encode". If so, you could definitely use a more powerful GPU! Be aware that video encoding speed doesn't scale quite as well as gaming speed. So while a GTX 1070 might be 4x faster at gaming and nearly 4x more expensive than a GTX 1050, it won't be 4x faster at video encode. There are definitely some diminishing returns in that regard.

With that said, a few GTX 1070 models have dropped in price recently, and right now, the very best deal is on the Zotac GeForce GTX 1070 Mini. It's really the perfect 1070 model for an HTPC because it's compact, yet still has dual fans and a zero-fan mode for quiet operation at idle. Many 1070 models would be too big to fit in your system, and a few will lack that zero-fan mode. They all support HDMI 2.0.
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The HTPC Build / Re: The TBG Home Theater PC Build
« Last post by FrankC on Today at 03:09:34 AM »
Hello Ari,

Video encode is 99%, cpu is 43%, memory is 17% , converting from .ts to mp4 H.264 full HD 1080P using Movavi video suite converter. What is cool about the software is that it uses the video card to help convert to different formats. In addition to converting old VHS media to DVD I am using it to edit and convert saved channel master DVR+ recordings.

Would a 1070 card improve the time? does it offer 4K output? Which one would you recommend?

Thanks,
Frank
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The High-End Gaming and Work PC Builds / Re: The TBG $1,250 Quiet Gaming PC Build
« Last post by Xilanz on December 09, 2018, 06:29:00 PM »
Hmm I wasn't aware of that issue with the 840 (which is currently the boot drive).  That could explain some of the odd stuttering it has developed more recently that certainly seemed unusual in a SSD!  When I reimage the machine to pass it along I'll just remove the 840 entirely and make the 850 the boot drive.
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The High-End Gaming and Work PC Builds / Re: The TBG $1,250 Quiet Gaming PC Build
« Last post by Ari Altman on December 09, 2018, 02:50:32 PM »
Understood, thanks again!  I elected to get two of the SX8200s for simplicity and the 9700k so hopefully I'll have it all up and running soon.  I'll be coming from an I5-2500k with a GTX680, Samsung 840 and 850 EVO drives which, all things considered, has held up pretty well over the years but I expect the new system should be a noticeable improvement!

Congrats on ordering your new system! This is a huge step up, seriously. The GPU is a legitimate three times faster, which is something you really do notice. And you'll be able to get the most out of it with the Core i7-9700K. I know a lot of people have hung onto their quad-cores thinking they were the greatest thing since sliced bread, and while they were five years ago, four cores simply isn't enough today. Some games work well on them, some won't run at all and are a stuttery mess. Anyway, the 9700K and RTX 2070 is a very balanced setup, and you'll see your RTX 2070 running at 100% load in all games, which is what you want to see.

As for the SSDs, hey, if you have the budget for it, dual SX8200 Pros are a simply awesome setup. Remember that for games, the SX8200 won't do much, but at least your game installs will be blazing fast!

Overall, you're upgrading from a great circa 2012 system that was an excellent investment at the time, and moving to a system that's of a similar caliber (and probably similar cost). Another good investment - you'll get at least five years use of it no problem, especially if you upgrade the GPU in about 3 years. By the way, the 850 Evo, released in 2014, was simply ahead of its time. I still run three of them in TBG's systems, and they keep up with any of the latest SATA SSDs, so don't let that drive go to waste! The 840 Evo was unfortunately plagued with a design flaw that required a performance-capping firmware update. I also run a few of these, but they aren't of much use today as an OS drive. Samsung never lived up to its error here. You can see my May 2015 op-ed on it here.
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The High-End Gaming and Work PC Builds / Re: The TBG $1,250 Quiet Gaming PC Build
« Last post by Xilanz on December 09, 2018, 01:07:23 PM »
Understood, thanks again!  I elected to get two of the SX8200s for simplicity and the 9700k so hopefully I'll have it all up and running soon.  I'll be coming from an I5-2500k with a GTX680, Samsung 840 and 850 EVO drives which, all things considered, has held up pretty well over the years but I expect the new system should be a noticeable improvement!
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The High-End Gaming and Work PC Builds / Re: The TBG $1,250 Quiet Gaming PC Build
« Last post by Ari Altman on December 09, 2018, 01:04:21 PM »
Ok great, thanks! Iím still getting a handle on the current preferred brands of tech so appreciate the guidance on the ones to steer clear of at present.

Would an I9 run too hot in the Silent Case with just the Noctua cooler? I wouldnít be trying to overclock it at least.

The Core i9-9900K is a 145W CPU being marketed as a 95W CPU. It simply requires liquid cooling to run at stock settings, let alone when overclocking. It's therefor not suitable for a quiet build.
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The High-End Gaming and Work PC Builds / Re: The TBG $1,250 Quiet Gaming PC Build
« Last post by Xilanz on December 09, 2018, 12:36:18 PM »
Ok great, thanks! Iím still getting a handle on the current preferred brands of tech so appreciate the guidance on the ones to steer clear of at present.

Would an I9 run too hot in the Silent Case with just the Noctua cooler if it wasn't overclocked?  Or would that occur just through the course of the normal core boosting?  There's not much of a price difference from the 9700k to the 8700k but would there be any reason to get the 8700 over the 9700?
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The High-End Gaming and Work PC Builds / Re: The TBG $1,250 Quiet Gaming PC Build
« Last post by Ari Altman on December 09, 2018, 09:28:00 AM »
Actually a couple of additional quick questions when you have time!

1) I'm also planning to do some work involving intense Excel spreadsheets in addition to gaming.  I know Excel can benefit from additional cores so for that would a Ryzen be a better alternative perhaps sacrificing a little from the gaming side?  And would it be worth waiting until the 3000 series is out for comparison at this point?

2) I'd like to have use a USB-C cable with the case as I'm planning to get an iPhone Xs fairly soon.  Will the Phanteks case be suitable for that?  Would I need a different motherboard for either Intel or Ryzen to offer better USB connectivity if so?

3) I don't tend to upgrade as frequently now so I'd rather future-proof the system a little when it makes sense.  I currently have two SATA SSD drives and I'm thinkin I'll just get two nVME drives in the new build to mimic that setup.  In that scenario since I don't tend to do a lot of file copying but do have some load-intensive games is having a premium speed nVME boot drive (like the XPG SX2800 1TB) coupled with a less expensive data drive (perhaps a Crucial P1 1TB) work well or should I try to match the drive speeds?

Thanks again for your advice!

Here are your answers:

(1) Ryzen vs Core i7 for Excel: First of all, the Ryzen 3000 series isn't going to be here for at least six months, so no, I'm not going to recommend that. If you've been reading the recent rumors about Ryzen 3000 incoming, be informed that they are false. I'll be meeting privately with AMD's Ryzen execs at CES in a month, and will have the latest actual info on the 3000 series soon enough. And anyway, the Core i7-9700K is nearly as fast as the Ryzen 7 2700X in Excel, and much faster for gaming, so it's a better overall pick for a mixed-use system unless you're actually running complicated Excel computations much of the day.

(2) USB-C: it would be cool to have a USB-C port in the front of the case, but actually all phones ship with USB-A to USB-C cables, not straight USB-C to -C cables. That's because there's basically no reason to have the terminating end be USB-C, other than the reversability, but phone manufacturers know that no one has that kind of port, even on chargers. By the way, the iPhone of course does not conform to any industry standards. It uses a Lightning cable, so this is kind of moot point if you're getting an iPhone X.

(3) SSDs: While PCIe drives are faster than SATA drives, buying two to be matching isn't really beneficial. Think of SSDs as tools for a particular job: where there's a lot of random read/write or long file copies, PCIe drives help a lot. That's on an OS drive or swap drive (for photo/video editing). For gaming, PCIe drives are irrelevant, except for the game install (if you're installing a Steam game from and to the same drive, a PCIe drive will be 3-4x faster). For level loading, PCIe drives are a non-factor. And the Crucial P1 is a piece of junk. It will never get a recommendation on this site. Way too handicapped to be worth buying thanks to its awful QLC NAND. The only way it would make sense is if it were cheaper than SATA TLC drives. It should be cheaper to make, but Crucial/Micron is still having teething pains on manufacturing this new product, so it's not cheaper.

In short, the only change I'd make to this system would be to upgrade the OS drive to an XPG SX8200 Pro 1TB (this a brand-new drive, as in less than a week since release, and it's going to cut into Samsung's sales badly since it's so good!). If you'd like two drives, make the second a Crucial MX500 1TB.
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The High-End Gaming and Work PC Builds / Re: The TBG $1,250 Quiet Gaming PC Build
« Last post by Xilanz on December 09, 2018, 06:36:13 AM »
Actually a couple of additional quick questions when you have time!

1) I'm also planning to do some work involving intense Excel spreadsheets in addition to gaming.  I know Excel can benefit from additional cores so for that would a Ryzen be a better alternative perhaps sacrificing a little from the gaming side?  And would it be worth waiting until the 3000 series is out for comparison at this point?

2) I'd like to have use a USB-C cable with the case as I'm planning to get an iPhone Xs fairly soon.  Will the Phanteks case be suitable for that?  Would I need a different motherboard for either Intel or Ryzen to offer better USB connectivity if so?

3) I don't tend to upgrade as frequently now so I'd rather future-proof the system a little when it makes sense.  I currently have two SATA SSD drives and I'm thinkin I'll just get two nVME drives in the new build to mimic that setup.  In that scenario since I don't tend to do a lot of file copying but do have some load-intensive games is having a premium speed nVME boot drive (like the XPG SX2800 1TB) coupled with a less expensive data drive (perhaps a Crucial P1 1TB) work well or should I try to match the drive speeds?

Thanks again for your advice!
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The owner of PCPartPicker doesn't actually test, review, or build anything, certainly not SSF PCs. His algorithm is just based on specifications, and it often gets things wrong because it doesn't actually know how parts go together. There's no human, or any actual knowledge, behind what PCPP recommends. It's just an automated shopping site.

So to answer your question, everything will fit, and all cables and supplies are included, other than the screwdrivers. This build is a bit more difficult than a standard PC because there's not much room to work inside the case, so you'll have to pay attention to bundling cables out of the way, but otherwise, it's very straightforward.
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