Author Topic: The TBG Wireless Networking Buyer's Guide  (Read 2032 times)

Ari Altman

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The TBG Wireless Networking Buyer's Guide
« on: March 03, 2014, 06:40:08 PM »
Here's the thread to discuss the "Wireless Networking Buyer's Guide", update semi-annually on The Tech Buyer's Guru.

The guide can be found here:

http://techbuyersguru.com/NetworkingAdvice.php
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 07:51:40 AM by Ari Altman »

Suanki

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Re: The TBG Wireless Networking Buyer's Guide
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2016, 08:49:12 AM »
Hello Ari,

I have posted before on this site about the 750$ Gaming build, and am actually building it with my brother and dad come tomorrow evening.  I had a question regarding wireless/Bluetooth capability.  I am currently going through Time Warner Cable so I don't need a router (correct?) and wanted to know, since the 750 build doesn't come with a Wireless/BT already built in, if you had any recommendations on what I should look into buying for wireless and Bluetooth capability. 

I also apologize if this isn't the correct thread for this question.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 08:56:33 AM by Suanki »

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG Wireless Networking Buyer's Guide
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2016, 10:24:55 AM »
Hello Ari,

I have posted before on this site about the 750$ Gaming build, and am actually building it with my brother and dad come tomorrow evening.  I had a question regarding wireless/Bluetooth capability.  I am currently going through Time Warner Cable so I don't need a router (correct?) and wanted to know, since the 750 build doesn't come with a Wireless/BT already built in, if you had any recommendations on what I should look into buying for wireless and Bluetooth capability. 

I also apologize if this isn't the correct thread for this question.

To get Wireless and Bluetooth, you do typically need to add an external USB adapter or an internal PCIe adapter. Only very high-end motherboards come with wireless/BT built in.

If you really need Bluetooth, there actually aren't many options, which is a bit odd. Gigabyte makes the most popular combined wireless/BT card. If you just need WiFi, there are plenty of options, as provided in the Wireless Networking Buyer's Guide, which you probably already saw.

By the way, whether you need a wireless router depends on whether your ISP (Time Warner) provides a combined modem/router. If you're currently using wireless in your home with it, then you know it does wireless, and you won't need to add a separate wireless router. If this is a new internet setup, you'll have to check on the specifications of the Time Warner device.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 10:27:00 AM by Ari Altman »

Suanki

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Re: The TBG Wireless Networking Buyer's Guide
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2016, 10:40:52 AM »
Thank you very much, and I just realized if I use my PS4 headset, I could just use the USB adapter from that and plug that into the computer.  So I should just need the Wireless adapter itself.    You are the man and I appreciate all these little helpful hints and details you provide! 

Edit: Ignore me, I have a headset I can plug in.  WOOHOO!
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 11:07:34 AM by Suanki »

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG Wireless Networking Buyer's Guide
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2016, 11:53:44 AM »
Thank you very much, and I just realized if I use my PS4 headset, I could just use the USB adapter from that and plug that into the computer.  So I should just need the Wireless adapter itself.    You are the man and I appreciate all these little helpful hints and details you provide! 

Edit: Ignore me, I have a headset I can plug in.  WOOHOO!

Sounds good!

If you need help picking the right WiFi adapter to use with your Time Warner cable, just post back here! It will in part come down to whether you're running an 802.11n or 802.11ac wireless network.

Secret

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Re: The TBG Wireless Networking Buyer's Guide
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2016, 07:52:07 PM »
When top tier ISPs are still limiting speeds to 100Mbps, what exactly is the need for modems that transfer 4000 Mbps?

In most places I've been over the last few years I deal with 60-70 Mbps bandwidth, which I can almost hit on an antique 802.11g card.  The only change I notice between g/n/ac and wired is ping,  and between the wireless cards it's a negligible amount.

I've been thinking of upgrading my old Lynksys n750 but I don't see a point.  I have multiple phones, a laptop, game consoles, printer, and a Blu-ray player going all day and it doesn't hiccup.  The only reason I've considered something with more bandwidth was to setup storage on the network.  So unless you're moving data within the house on a wireless network I don't see the point, but I would more than happy to hear reason.

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG Wireless Networking Buyer's Guide
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2016, 10:33:20 PM »
When top tier ISPs are still limiting speeds to 100Mbps, what exactly is the need for modems that transfer 4000 Mbps?

In most places I've been over the last few years I deal with 60-70 Mbps bandwidth, which I can almost hit on an antique 802.11g card.  The only change I notice between g/n/ac and wired is ping,  and between the wireless cards it's a negligible amount.

I've been thinking of upgrading my old Lynksys n750 but I don't see a point.  I have multiple phones, a laptop, game consoles, printer, and a Blu-ray player going all day and it doesn't hiccup.  The only reason I've considered something with more bandwidth was to setup storage on the network.  So unless you're moving data within the house on a wireless network I don't see the point, but I would more than happy to hear reason.

For a long time I thought the same way you did. If all someone had was 25Mbps service, all they needed was an 802.11n router. But there are a few reasons you might want a faster router even with mid-grade internet service:

(1) Range: it's not just about whether 802.11g or 802.11n or 802.11ac has the longest range based on the laws of physics. It's about the power of the router. My Linksys EA9500 has substantially greater range on the 802.11ac 5GHz band than lower-end routers have on the 802.11n 2.4GHz band. Basically, new high-end routers have grown in size and processing power to overcome the inherent range disadvantage of 802.11ac networking, which has provided the winning combination of 802.11ac's huge speed advantage along with an increase in range.

(2) Multiple radios: while you may have had luck so far with your Linksys N750 rotuer, newer routers with multiple radios are much more adept at handling modern usage patterns. You can dedicate the 802.11n radio to lower-bandwidth devices like phones, printers, and smart home devices, while having an 802.11ac radio (or two) used exclusively by high-demand devices like TVs, HTPCs, tablets, and game consoles. That allows more of them to be connected simultaneously.

And as an aside, while it's true that most DSL companies have capped their service at 12Mbps and most cable companies have capped their service at around 50-125Mbps, that isn't the end of the road. I'm on Gigabit fiber, and more and more communities are seeing fiber arrive to compete with the entrenched DSL/Cable companies that have had little incentive to increase bandwidth.