Author Topic: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build  (Read 16047 times)

Blackdog990

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #120 on: September 02, 2016, 08:48:02 PM »
Im considering this 1500 build with ram bumped to 16gigs and the video card to the gtx 1080. I figure if im gonna invest, i might as well splurge some to give the system a little more longevity (im taregting high fps 1440p gaming). That said, the reviews of the 1080 on amazon say the card can frequently overheat. Should i be upgrading the case cooling fan with the new video card or are there any other things i should consider if making that move?

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #121 on: September 02, 2016, 09:54:58 PM »
Im considering this 1500 build with ram bumped to 16gigs and the video card to the gtx 1080. I figure if im gonna invest, i might as well splurge some to give the system a little more longevity (im taregting high fps 1440p gaming). That said, the reviews of the 1080 on amazon say the card can frequently overheat. Should i be upgrading the case cooling fan with the new video card or are there any other things i should consider if making that move?

Welcome to The TBG Forum, Blackdog990!

I have the EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 SC, and it most certainly doesn't overheat. The cooler on the GeForce GTX 1080 FTW is even more capable, as it uses larger-diameter fans.

I think what you're reading in user reviews is people misunderstanding how Pascal clockrates work. They are completely dynamic, regardless of temperature, whereas in the past clockrates would hold constant until a certain temperature threshold was reached. That is no longer true. All custom-cooled GTX 1080 cards will run at under 80C, which is absolutely fine, and cannot be considered "overheating."  In other words, you won't need additional case cooling to compensate. In fact with two 140mm case fans, this build is already quite well equipped, even for the upgrade to a GTX 1080. By the way, in my benchmarking, the GTX 1080 is about 24% faster than the GTX 1070, which is certainly noticeable, especially with 1440p/high-refresh rate gaming.

As for the upgrade to 16GB, I agree that is a good investment if you plan on keeping the system a long time, although more RAM can always be added later.

Blackdog990

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #122 on: September 03, 2016, 06:50:28 AM »
Thank you for the insight! I've got two other questions on this build if you dont mind (forgive me, I've been out of the PC world since WoW WOTLK so I'm feeling very behind on the times)

1-I'm debating running an Ethernet to where my PC will be (a royal pain) and just using wifi. From my ipad running speedtest where the pc wold sit, I get ~35mbs down, 5.8 up, and 40 ping (not sure what ping to game server would be though.) From my hardline, i really only gain another ~20mbs down and ping dropped to 20. I'm of the mind that I likely would not experience much difference while gaming (barring a bunch of people simultaneously hooking up to the wifi.) Would you agree? If so, would the BT/wifi card combo you present in the network buyers guide be sufficient to pull in what my router is putting out?

2-I am also considering the Acer Predator XB271HU from your monitor guide. It seems like a good mid-high end display that will give me the upgraded 1440p experience without going absolutely nuts on cost. That said, I noticed it uses a "display port" cable which i have never seen before. I noticed above you mention that upgrading the motherboard from the 1500 build nets a display port output. Would i want to get the "gaming 5" motherboard to take advantage of the display port for this monitor or would i be plugging this directly into the video card anyway?

Appreciate your help, this website is really exactly what I hoped to find when i started thinking about taking this project on!

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #123 on: September 03, 2016, 08:13:25 AM »
Thank you for the insight! I've got two other questions on this build if you dont mind (forgive me, I've been out of the PC world since WoW WOTLK so I'm feeling very behind on the times)

1-I'm debating running an Ethernet to where my PC will be (a royal pain) and just using wifi. From my ipad running speedtest where the pc wold sit, I get ~35mbs down, 5.8 up, and 40 ping (not sure what ping to game server would be though.) From my hardline, i really only gain another ~20mbs down and ping dropped to 20. I'm of the mind that I likely would not experience much difference while gaming (barring a bunch of people simultaneously hooking up to the wifi.) Would you agree? If so, would the BT/wifi card combo you present in the network buyers guide be sufficient to pull in what my router is putting out?

2-I am also considering the Acer Predator XB271HU from your monitor guide. It seems like a good mid-high end display that will give me the upgraded 1440p experience without going absolutely nuts on cost. That said, I noticed it uses a "display port" cable which i have never seen before. I noticed above you mention that upgrading the motherboard from the 1500 build nets a display port output. Would i want to get the "gaming 5" motherboard to take advantage of the display port for this monitor or would i be plugging this directly into the video card anyway?

Appreciate your help, this website is really exactly what I hoped to find when i started thinking about taking this project on!

Hello again!

I would absolutely suggest you try a relatively-inexpensive 802.11ac networking card like the Gigabyte GC-WB867 before running a cable to a remote location. The 802.11ac protocol can definitely handle speeds around 35-50Mbps, even at a distance. Just keep in mind that you need an 802.11ac router to get the most out of it, although even 35Mbps will have no trouble supporting any multiplayer online game.

As for DisplayPort on the motherboard, you actually have it exactly right: you're going to be plugging into the video card anyway. But there's a reason DisplayPort is still nice to have on the board, and that is for trouble-shooting, or for card swaps. I am constantly in and out of my benchmark systems swapping cards, and sometimes my systems will sit for a while without a video card. That's when I absolutely need DP on the motherboard. But if you aren't too worried about running without a video card, then DP on the board is an unnecessary expense.

By the way, two additional insights for you:

1. The Acer XB271HU isn't a mid-high end display, it's a super high-end display! It just so happens to be lower-priced that the huge displays, but its performance is actually the very best among elite monitors.

2. If your gaming preference tends towards WoW-style games, you really may be better off saving the money on the video card by going with the GTX 1070 over the 1080. On the other hand, if you want to push high 1440p frame rates in games like The Witcher 3, Rise of the Tomb Raider, or Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, the extra horsepower will come in handy.

Blackdog990

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #124 on: September 03, 2016, 09:58:34 AM »
Thanks again! Appreciate the guidance.

Not planning on picking WOW back up (I don't think the fiancÚ would let me get away with that, haha). Was actually eyeing Battlefield 1 as the first game I'd plug in. I'm thinking this setup will let me run that maxed out on 1440p and still get good frame rates. Hopefully, even if I'm going a little overkill up front, the system will hold its own for awhile and give me a good platform from which to upgrade as time goes on.

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #125 on: September 03, 2016, 12:48:40 PM »
Thanks again! Appreciate the guidance.

Not planning on picking WOW back up (I don't think the fiancÚ would let me get away with that, haha). Was actually eyeing Battlefield 1 as the first game I'd plug in. I'm thinking this setup will let me run that maxed out on 1440p and still get good frame rates. Hopefully, even if I'm going a little overkill up front, the system will hold its own for awhile and give me a good platform from which to upgrade as time goes on.

FYI, I'm testing the BF1 beta on both a 1080 setup and a 1070SLI setup at 1440p Gsync, and both are super smooth maxed out. Hitting 80-90fps on the 1080 and 120-130fps on 1070SLI. A single 1070 would still be good, but would be slightly below the optimal fps for Gsync, which is around 75-80.

I spoke with the DICE (developer of BF) yesterday at PAX, and they're proud of how efficient the latest Frostbyte engine is, despite being more advanced than BF4 or Star Wars Battlefront, which used previous iterations. It really doesn't require huge graphics power to look its best.

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #126 on: September 13, 2016, 10:12:11 AM »
We had a great question come in from a reader that we thought we'd share, since it's a very timely one related to SSD storage:

"I have a question about the $1500 High End Gaming PC build.  I'd like to have more storage space, as I'll be replacing a computer that had a 2TB mechanical hard drive and a 250 GB SSD. I was storing about 850GB of data on the one drive and 200-ish GB on the other.  So I'll need more than the 960 GB shown in your build. Can you recommend a good hard drive upgrade?"

-----------------------------------------------------------

Here's our response:

So, you have three options if you want more storage space:

(1) Pick up two Toshiba OCZ TR150 960GB drives, which offer tremendous value for the price.

(2) Pick up a mechanical drive for bulk storage of items not needing fast load times (i.e., please don't put apps on it!). A good option is the Toshiba 2TB drive.

(3) If you want the fastest, most streamlined solution, you'd get a 2TB SSD, and the new Crucial MX300 2TB is the one to beat in terms of speed and capacity for the price.

Now, you still pay a premium per GB for this much space on a single SSD, but the drive does offer over double the capacity of the OCZ 960GB, along with slightly faster performance, so it's price is pretty well justified.

Blackdog990

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #127 on: September 21, 2016, 07:39:39 AM »
Hi Ari,

Per the above discussion, I ended up following your 1500 build with and upgrade to 16gb ram and a 1080 gpu. I got it all put together without a hitch and have the OS and drivers updated. I also got the predator hb271hu gaming monitor.

While I wait for BF1 to come out, I put over watch on the system as I'm already a pretty avid player on console. With settings on ultra, I'm hitting 80 to 90 FPS on it, and as many hz from the monitor. Based on what I've seen online, I feel like I should be getting more FPS, even at ultra, with this Gpu.

My question is, do I need to optimize anything post setup to get full power out of this system? The note about needing to change the frequency of the ram comes to mind (which I did). Is there anything else I should be tweaking? The gpu software already auto optimizes for the game, so I wouldn't think the changes would be there but I'm new at this and that would be my first thought.

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #128 on: September 21, 2016, 08:11:54 AM »
Hi Ari,

Per the above discussion, I ended up following your 1500 build with and upgrade to 16gb ram and a 1080 gpu. I got it all put together without a hitch and have the OS and drivers updated. I also got the predator hb271hu gaming monitor.

While I wait for BF1 to come out, I put over watch on the system as I'm already a pretty avid player on console. With settings on ultra, I'm hitting 80 to 90 FPS on it, and as many hz from the monitor. Based on what I've seen online, I feel like I should be getting more FPS, even at ultra, with this Gpu.

My question is, do I need to optimize anything post setup to get full power out of this system? The note about needing to change the frequency of the ram comes to mind (which I did). Is there anything else I should be tweaking? The gpu software already auto optimizes for the game, so I wouldn't think the changes would be there but I'm new at this and that would be my first thought.

Congrats on getting your new system up and running! Those are some big upgrades, making this a lot more like the $2,000 Build than the $1,500 Build!

To really get a sense of what's going on with your video card, I recommend you download MSI Afterburner in order to track in the background GPU usage and clockrates, as well as CPU usage. You can also display these during your game if you wish.

But to get a good sense of whether the system is actually running well, you'll need to run 3DMark Fire Strike or Time Spy. Those will give you numbers that can easily be compared to other systems (including TBG's 6700K/GTX1080) benchmarking rig. Provide some results from 3DMark and I'll check them against TBG's results.

Blackdog990

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #129 on: September 22, 2016, 12:00:07 PM »
3d mark time spy came in at 6829 overall, 7195 graphics (at 47 and 41 FPS) and 5302 cpu at 18 fps. Does that feel in the ballpark of where this system should be hitting?

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #130 on: September 22, 2016, 12:57:50 PM »
3d mark time spy came in at 6829 overall, 7195 graphics (at 47 and 41 FPS) and 5302 cpu at 18 fps. Does that feel in the ballpark of where this system should be hitting?

It's precisely in the ballpark. Here's the TBG Intel Core i7-6700K @4.4GHz and EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Superclocked:

Overall Score: 6,820
Graphics Score: 7,161
CPU Score: 5,374

If anything, your CPU score is surprisingly high. Your motherboard may have engaged multi-core enhancement to run at 4.2GHz, which is a slight overclock versus the 4GHz standard. And your GPU is working perfectly.

With regard to the issues you were having in Overwatch, it could be that your drivers need updating, or perhaps a specific setting was dragging down the results. Sometimes even a restart will clear up game-specific issues.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2016, 04:12:24 PM by Ari Altman »

Blackdog990

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #131 on: September 24, 2016, 09:16:31 AM »
Thanks for the peace of mind that my system is running about where it should be!

I poked around and it seems my gpu was scaling up the resolution beyond 1440p for some reason. I dialed that back and my FPS are up to 120 or so on ultra at 1440p, which feels closer to where I would expect.

Appreciate the help, love the site!

Ari Altman

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Re: The TBG $1,500 High-End Gaming PC Build
« Reply #132 on: September 24, 2016, 10:04:16 AM »
Thanks for the peace of mind that my system is running about where it should be!

I poked around and it seems my gpu was scaling up the resolution beyond 1440p for some reason. I dialed that back and my FPS are up to 120 or so on ultra at 1440p, which feels closer to where I would expect.

Appreciate the help, love the site!

Sounds like you figured it out - resolution scaling is a nice way to improve image quality when you have more GPU power than you need for a given game. Some games play batter at higher framerates (assuming you have a high-refresh rate monitor), while others don't need high framerates, so you can enjoy better graphics quality with them using scaling.

DennisD

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Rookie Looking at the TBG $1,500 & $1,250 PC Build for SIM Racing
« Reply #133 on: September 27, 2016, 06:02:05 PM »
Hello, I'm just getting into iRacing (Sim Racing) and building my first PC. I'm hoping I can get some expert advise and opinions on both the $1500 and $1250 builds but I'm open to suggestions (I'm trying to get up to speed on the components). I will be using it primarily for sim racing and general computing. I'm planning on running 3 monitors. I would like a PC that will do a great job with nice graphics and speed for now and in the future.  Could I get by with less?

Thank you for your help!!!

Ari Altman

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Re: Rookie Looking at the TBG $1,500 & $1,250 PC Build for SIM Racing
« Reply #134 on: September 27, 2016, 06:43:57 PM »
Hello, I'm just getting into iRacing (Sim Racing) and building my first PC. I'm hoping I can get some expert advise and opinions on both the $1500 and $1250 builds but I'm open to suggestions (I'm trying to get up to speed on the components). I will be using it primarily for sim racing and general computing. I'm planning on running 3 monitors. I would like a PC that will do a great job with nice graphics and speed for now and in the future.  Could I get by with less?

Thank you for your help!!!

Hello DennisD, and welcome to The TBG Forum!

The good news is that racing games do not need as much power as typical 3D games to perform well. For your triple-monitor iRacing setup, however, are you planning on spanning your game across all three screens, as is typical for racing simulators? If so, you'll still need a lot of graphics horsepower, because your resolution will likely be 3 x 1920 x 1080. Sims also need serious CPU power, due to the physics involved in re-creating the racing experience.

I'd therefore go for the $1,500 High-End PC Build, which uses the GTX 1070 video card, rather than the $1,250 Build, which uses a GTX 1060. The 1070 is about 30% faster, which will help for a triple-monitor setup. On the other hand, if you'll just be racing on one monitor, a 1060 is plenty fast.

There a two areas where you can save some money:
(1) you can save almost $100 on the solid-state drive, assuming you'll only have a few games loaded on it. Just drop down from the 960GB model to the OCZ Trion 150 480GB. That should still have enough space for around 10 games plus your general-usage apps, but if you have a lot of media (photos, music, etc.), it could get a little tight.

(2) you can save another $20 or so going with the Arctic i32 CPU Cooler, which is the one recommended for the $1,250 Build. It's not going to allow extreme overclocking, but that won't affect your uses at all.